Best Practices When Participating in a Livestream

Here is a guide to follow when participating in a livestream.

person holding register to vote sign

From your perspective, the livestream event will be a normal Zoom video conference call. You will receive the call information for the video call before the event. 

You will need to join the call at least 10 minutes prior to your scheduled speech time. We’ll be using Zoom’s webinar function and you’ll be upgraded from an attendee into a panelist when it’s time for you to speak. Please use your full name when you sign in to Zoom so that we can find you from the attendee list. When it’s your turn, you’ll have to unmute yourself and turn your camera on, we can’t control those features. When you’re speaking you can share your screen if you want to show any slides or other material. Once your section is over, you’ll be moved back into an attendee. 


Technology

 

Quality: To ensure the best quality, use a computer wired into your router or cable modem. The second best alternative is a computer connected to Wi-Fi. The third and most unreliable alternative is using a tablet (iPad) or a phone connected to a Wi-Fi or with a strong cell phone connection. We recommend checking your connection speed via  https://www.speedtest.net/. If your connection is slower than 1 or 2 MBPS on upload, you are going to have a problem maintaining a high-quality feed. You really want this connection to be between 3-8 MBPS. Keep in mind that other people on the internet in your home or office will impact your connection speed. 


Audio: We request that you use the computer audio feature and not the call-in feature for audio. Apple iPhone earbuds, Bluetooth headsets, etc. should be fine. Audio from a phone or computer’s internal mic will work but are not preferred. Beware of papers and other things you may be doing during the livestream. Most devices have omnidirectional microphone that can catch all kinds of noise around them. You can also block your computer microphone by laying paper and notes on your laptop keyboard.

 

Testing: We recommend you do a test with your set-up prior to the live stream event. All you would do is join a Zoom meeting with a friend, family member, or a staff member in the location you plan to be and with the technology (computer/tablet/phone and microphone, headphones etc.) you plan to use for the actual livestream. 

Be aware that you are heard: Remember you are LIVE, that means, no editing, you can not go back and edit something you said wrong. Also, unless you mute your microphone, people will listen to everything you say even when you do not intend to be a part of the conversation. We can’t control your audio feed in the studio, only you can mute or unmute yourself. 

You are being viewed: Act as if you are always being viewed during the livestream even when someone is speaking. When you are a part of a 2+ person event on a livestream and it’s not your turn to participate don’t assume people can’t see you. There will be a participant in the meeting called DI& studio. The camera feed for this participant will be broadcasting the live studio mixed feed back to the group. On Zoom, you can pin this feed so you can see what the audiences sees. 

We ask that you only turn off your camera under rare circumstances. Shutting your camera off can impact onscreen the set-up for other guests. The event director sees your feed at all times and will be able to keep you off screen if something seems to be happening in your background. 

Screen view: Make sure you are not too close to the camera. Try to angle the camera lens so we can see your full face, and part of your chest and the wall behind you. We don’t want your full face to cover the livestream video. 

DON’T

DO

We want to be able to see you: Make sure there is plenty of light in the location you are joining the livestream from. Make sure there is light in front of you and not too much behind you. Face a window rather than put your back towards it. It is always better to have your camera shooting directly at eye level or above you. Try to avoid an upward angle. 

Ideally, any bright light source should be positioned behind and slightly above your camera for best results.

This is an example of what not to do: Having a bright light source behind you will make your face hard to see, and the background blown out.

Control your environment as much as you can:  Make sure you’re participating in the event in a controlled environment – this could mean a studio space or a room with the door locked and hopefully away from street noise. Try to avoid outdoor spaces where possible.

Showing a PowerPoint presentation 

If you want, you can share a PowerPoint presentation from your computer. To do that open the PowerPoint file you want to share before joining the conference. When it’s your turn to speak click on the share screen button in the meeting controls. We recommend that you test this feature while you’re testing your technology so that you’re comfortable with the screen share function. 

When you are designing your presentation keep in mind that less is more. People might view the conference on their mobile phones or tables, so they are not able to see small text. Therefore, we recommend that you use big font, try to keep text to minimum, and maximize the space. 

The best online presentations are simple and straightforward. You want people to focus on your presentation instead of squinting at their screens and trying to figure out what they are watching. People should be able to take a look of the slide and get the point at a single glance. Try to present just one idea or point per slide. 


In addition to keeping text to minimum, use as many visuals as you can. They make the presentation easier to digest and will also keep your audience engaged. In addition to photos, you can use charts, graphs, icons, illustrations, maps, and gifs. You can also animate your presentation or add interactive features like hover effects to make the presentation even more engaging. 

Diane Castañeda, Social Media and Media Relations Manager
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Sign up for more tips

Thank you for signing up for more tips!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Sign up for more tips

Thank you for signing up for more tips!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Sign up for more tips

Thank you for signing up for more tips!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Sign up for more tips

Thank you for signing up for more tips!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR SERVICES

Other posts you might be interested in

Guide to Display Ads and Their Specs

Read More

5 Tips on How to Write Engaging Ad Copy

Read More

10 Best Practices for Political Campaigns on Facebook

Read More

Facebook Political Advertising Changes

Read More
Digital Impact & is a full-service communications firm ready to help you develop results-driven campaigns designed to elevate your story & surpass your goals. By leveraging more than 25 years of communications & marketing experience, we implement specialized solutions, including paid online advertising, website development, professional livestreams & email marketing campaigns that deliver platform optimized creatives for our clients.
yellow pixelsblue, orange and white pixelsblue and orange pixels
Sand Diego Organizing Project Facebook adSand Diego Organizing Project Facebook adSand Diego Organizing Project Facebook adSand Diego Organizing Project Facebook adSand Diego Organizing Project Facebook ad

Are You Ready To Make An Impact?

Thank you! We'll get back to you soon!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Proud member of
Businesses For Good logo.
Microsoft Advertising Certified Professional logo.Shopify Partners logo.